International Journal of Communication 13(2019), 1143-1166



Descargar 227,76 Kb.
Ver original pdf
Página3/3
Fecha de conversión28.11.2019
Tamaño227,76 Kb.
1   2   3

Popular Media Culture6(1), 48–60. 

 

boyd, d. (2007). Why youth (heart) social networking sites: The role of networked publics in teenage 



social life. In D. Buckingham (Ed.), MacArthur Foundation series on digital learning: Youth, 

identity and media volume (pp. 119–142). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 

 

Burns, A. (2015). Selfies self(ie)-discipline: Social regulation as enacted through the discussion of 



photographic practice. International Journal of Communication9, 1716–1733. 

 

Chávez, A. F., & Guido-DiBrito, F. (1999). Racial and ethnic identity and development. New Directions for 



Adult and Continuing Education, 84, 39–47. 

 

Crenshaw, K. (1989). Demarginalizing the intersection of race and sex: A Black feminist critique of 



antidiscrimination doctrine, feminist theory, and antiracist politics. The University of Chicago 

Legal Forum, 140, 139–167. 

 

Crocker, J., Major, B., & Steele, C. (1998). Social stigma. In D. Gilbert & S. Fiske (Eds.), Handbook of 



social psychology (pp. 504–553). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. 

 

Dhir, A., Pallesen, S., Torsheim, T., & Andreassen, C. S. (2016). Do age and gender differences exist in 



selfie-related behaviours? Computers in Human Behavior63, 549–555. 

 

Diefenbach, S., & Christoforakos, L. (2017). The selfie paradox: Nobody seems to like them yet everyone 



has reasons to take them. An exploration of psychological functions of selfies in self-presentation. 

Frontiers in Psychology8. doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00007 

 

Donath, J., & boyd, d. (2004). Public displays of connection. BT Technology Journal22(4), 71–82. 



 

Duguay, S. (2016). Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer visibility through selfies: Comparing platform 

mediators across Ruby Rose’s Instagram and Vine presence. Social Media + Society2(2). 

doi:10.1177/2056305116641975 

 

Eler, A. (2017). The selfie generation: How our self-images are changing our notions of privacy, sex, 



consent, and culture. New York, NY: Simon and Schuster. 

1162  Valerie Barker and Nathian Shae Rodriguez 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019) 

Eller, J. D. (2015). Culture and diversity in the United States: So many ways to be American. Abingdon, 

UK: Routledge. 

 

Florini, S. (2014). Tweets, tweeps, and signifyin’: Communication and cultural performance on “Black 



Twitter.” Television & New Media, 15, 223–237. 

 

Gallup. (2017, January 11). In U.S., more adults identifying as LGBT. Retrieved from 



https://news.gallup.com/poll/201731/lgbt-identification-rises.aspx  

 

Gil de Zúñiga, H., Garcia-Perdomo, V., & McGregor, S. C. (2015). What is second screening? Exploring 



motivations of second screen use and its effect on online political participation. Journal of 

Communication65(5), 793–815. 

 

Granovetter, M. (1983). The strength of weak ties: A network theory revisited. Sociological Theory1



201–233. 

 

Green, E. L., Benner, K., & Pear, R. (2018, October 18). Transgender could be defined out of existence 



under the Trump administration. Retrieved from 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/21/us/politics/transgender-trump-administration-sex-

definition.html  

 

Helms, J. E. (1993). I also said, “White racial identity influences White researchers.” The Counseling 



Psychologist, 21(2), 240–243. 

 

Hernández, J. R. L. (2009, May). Photo-ethnography by people living in poverty near the northern border 



of Mexico. Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung, 10(2), 35. Retrieved from http://www.qualitative-

research.net/index.php/fqs/article/view/1310/2787%3C/p%3E%3Cp%3ELuna-

Hern%C3%83%C2%A1ndez  

 

Hess, A. (2015). Selfies: The selfie assemblage. International Journal of Communication9, 1629–1646. 



 

Hogg, M. A., Abrams, D., & Brewer, M. B. (2017). Social identity: The role of self in group processes and 

intergroup relations. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations20(5), 1–12. 

 

Hogg, M. A., Abrams, D., Otten, S., & Hinkle, S. (2004). The social identity perspective: Intergroup 



relations, self-conception, and small groups. Small Group Research35(3), 246–276. 

 

Human Rights Campaign. (2019, February 6). Sexual orientation and gender identity definitions. Retrieved 



from https://www.hrc.org/resources/sexual-orientation-and-gender-identity-terminology-and-

definitions  

 

Investigating the style of self-portraits (selfies) in five cities across the world. (2019, February 6). 



selfiecity.net. Retrieved from http://selfiecity.net  

International Journal of Communication 13(2019)  

This Is Who I Am  1163 

Karadimitriou, A., & Veneti, A. (2016). Political selfies: Image events in the new media field. In A. 

Karatzogianni, D. Nguyen, & E. Serafinelli (Eds.), The digital transformation of the public sphere 

(pp. 321–340). London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. 

 

Katz, J. E., & Crocker, E. T. (2015). Selfies and photo messaging as visual conversation: Reports from the 



United States, United Kingdom and China. International Journal of Communication9, 1861–

1872. 


 

Kiang, L., Yip, T., & Fuligni, A. J. (2008). Multiple social identities and adjustment in young adults from 

ethnically diverse backgrounds. Journal of Research on Adolescence18(4), 643–670. 

 

Krämer, N. C., Feurstein, M., Kluck, J. P., Meier, Y., Rother, M., & Winter, S. (2017). Beware of selfies: 



The impact of photo type on impression formation based on social networking profiles. Frontiers 

in Psychology8, 1–14. 

 

Krasnova, H., Veltri, N. F., Eling, N., & Buxmann, P. (2017). Why men and women continue to use social 



networking sites: The role of gender differences. The Journal of Strategic Information Systems

26(4), 261–284. 

 

Lange, P. (2009). Videos of affinity on YouTube. In P. Snickars & P. Vonderau (Eds.), The YouTube reader 



(pp. 70–88). Stockholm, Sweden: National Library of Sweden. 

 

Larson, J. J., Whitton, S. W., Hauser, S. T., & Allen, J. P. (2007). Being close and being social: Peer 



ratings of distinct aspects of young adult social competence. Journal of Personality Assessment

89(2), 136–148. 

 

Lindgren, S. (2017). Digital media and society. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. 



 

Lobinger, K., & Brantner, C. (2015). In the eye of the beholder: Subjective views on the authenticity of 

selfies. International Journal of Communication9, 1848–1860. 

 

Luhtanen, R., & Crocker, J. (1992). A collective self-esteem scale: Self-evaluation of one’s social identity. 



Personality and Psychology Bulletin, 18, 302–318. 

 

Maddox, J. L. (2018). Fear and selfie-loathing in America: Identifying the interstices of othering, 



iconoclasm, and the selfie. The Journal of Popular Culture51(1), 26–49. 

 

Manago, A. M. (2015). Identity development in the digital age: The case of social networking sites. The 



Oxford handbook of identity (pp. 508–524). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. 

 

Mascheroni, G., Vincent, J., & Jimenez, E. (2015). “Girls are addicted to likes so they post semi-naked 



selfies”: Peer mediation, normativity and the construction of identity online. Cyberpsychology: 

Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, 9(1), 5. 

1164  Valerie Barker and Nathian Shae Rodriguez 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019) 

Mendelson, A. L., & Papacharissi, Z. (2010). Look at us: Collective narcissism in college student Facebook 

photo galleries. In Z. Papacharissi (Ed.), The networked self: Identity, community and culture on 



social network sites (pp. 251–273). New York, NY: Routledge. 

 

Moghadam, V. M. (1992). Patriarchy and the politics of gender in modernizing societies: Iran, Pakistan 



and Afghanistan. International Sociology7(1), 35–53. 

 

Morrow, D. F., & Messinger, L. (Eds.). (2006). Sexual orientation and gender expression in social work 



practice: Working with gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people. New York, NY: Columbia 

University Press. 

 

Noland, C. M. (2006). Auto-photography as research practice: Identity and self-esteem research. Journal 



of Research Practice2(1), 1–19. 

 

O’Hearn, C. C. (1998). Half-and-half writers on growing up biracial and bicultural. New York, NY: Pantheon 



Books. 

 

Pew Research Center. (2014, March 4). More than half of millennials have shared a selfie. Retrieved from 



http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/03/04/more-than-half-of-millennials-have-shared-

a-selfie  

 

Pew Research Center. (2018, March 1). Social media use in 2018. Retrieved from 



http://www.pewinternet.org/2018/03/01/social-media-use-in-2018  

 

Selfie. (n.d.). In Urban Dictionary online dictionary. Retrieved from 



https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Selfie  

 

Senft, T. M., & Baym, N. K. (2015). Selfies introduction: What does the selfie say? Investigating a global 



phenomenon. International Journal of Communication9, 1588–1606. 

 

Sorokowska, A., Oleszkiewicz, A., Frackowiak, T., Pisanski, K., Chmiel, A., & Sorokowski, P. (2016). 



Selfies and personality: Who posts self-portrait photographs? Personality and Individual 

Differences90, 119–123. 

 

Stets, J. E. (1995). Role identities and person identities: Gender identity, mastery identity, and controlling 



one’s partner. Sociological Perspectives, 38, 29–50. 

 

Stets, J., & Burke, P. (2000). Identity theory and social identity theory. Social Psychology Quarterly, 



63(3), 224–237. 

 

Tajfel, H. (Ed.). (1978). Differentiation between social groups. London, UK: Academic Press. 



 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019)  

This Is Who I Am  1165 

Tajfel, H., & Turner, J. C. (1986). The social identity of intergroup behavior. In S. Worchel & W. G. Austin 

(Eds.), Psychology of intergroup relations (pp. 7–24). Chicago, IL: Nelson. 

 

Tiidenberg, K., & Gómez Cruz, E. (2015). Selfies, image and the re-making of the body. Body & Society



21(4), 77–102. 

 

Tiidenberg, K., & Tekobbe, C. (2014, October). The things we can’t say in selfies—Narrating the self 



through GPOY, reaction-gif and “current status” images. AoIR Selected Papers of Internet 

Research4. Retrieved from https://firstmonday.org/ojs//index.php/spir/article/view/9065/7156  

 

Tropp, L. R., & Wright, S. C. (2001). Ingroup identification as the inclusion of ingroup in the self. 



Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin27(5), 585–600. 

 

Turner, J. C. (1981). Towards a cognitive redefinition of the social group. Cahiers de Psychologie 



Cognitive, 1(2), 93–118. 

 

Walsh, S. P., White, K. M., & McDonald-Young, R. (2009). The phone connection: A qualitative exploration 



of how belongingness and social identification relate to mobile phone use amongst Australian 

youth. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 19, 225–240. 

 

Walther, J. B., Carr, C. T., Choi, S. S. W., DeAndrea, D. C., Kim, J., Tong, T. S., & Van der Heide,  



B. (2011). Interaction of interpersonal, peer, and media influence sources online: A research 

agenda for technology convergence. In Z. Papacharissi (Ed.), A networked self: Identity, 



community, and culture on social network sites (pp. 17–38). New York, NY: Routledge. 

 

Warfield, K. (2014, October). Making selfies/making self: Digital subjectivities in the selfie. Paper 



presented at the Fifth International Conference on the Image and the Image Knowledge 

Community, Freie Universität, Berlin, Germany. 

 

Wargo, J. M. (2017). “Every selfie tells a story. . . .”: LGBTQ youth lifestreams and new media narratives 



as connective identity texts. New Media & Society19(4), 560–578. 

 

Watters, J. (2017). Pink hats and black fists: The role of women in the Black Lives Matter movement. 



William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice24, 199–207. 

 

Williams, A. A., & Marquez, B. A. (2015). The lonely selfie king: Selfies and the conspicuous prosumption 



of gender and race. International Journal of Communication9, 1775–1787. 

 

Williams, A., & Thurlow, C. (Eds.). (2005). Talking adolescence: Perspectives on communication in the 



teenage years (Vol. 3). New York, NY: Peter Lang. 

 


1166  Valerie Barker and Nathian Shae Rodriguez 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019) 

World Health Organization. (2019, February 6). Orientation programme on adolescent health for health-

care providers. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/maternal_child_adolescent/documents/ 

pdfs/9241591269_op_handout.pdf  

 

Yefimova, K., Neils, M., Newell, B. C., & Gómez, R. (2015, January). Fotohistorias: Participatory 



photography as a methodology to elicit the life experiences of migrants. In System Sciences 

(HICSS), 48th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (pp. 3672–3681). 

Piscataway, NJ: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. 

 

YouGov. (2017, February 27). Selfies. Retrieved from 



https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/document/untcbii3su/Results%20for%2

0YouGov%20NY%20(Selfies)%20039%2002.28.2017.pdf  



 

Zastrow, C. (2013). Brooks/Cole empowerment series: Introduction to social work and social welfare



Boston, MA: Cengage Learning. 

 


Compartir con tus amigos:
1   2   3


La base de datos está protegida por derechos de autor ©absta.info 2019
enviar mensaje

    Página principal