International Journal of Communication 13(2019), 1143-1166


Results    Hypothesis Testing



Descargar 227,76 Kb.
Ver original pdf
Página2/3
Fecha de conversión28.11.2019
Tamaño227,76 Kb.
1   2   3

Results 

 

Hypothesis Testing 

 

Hypothesis 1 predicted a positive relationship between identity motivations for selfies and selfie 



intensity. The bivariate correlations between selfie intensity and the identity motivations were positive and 

statistically significant (see Table 3). 

 

 

Table 3. Correlations: Identity Motivations for Selfies and Selfie Intensity. 



Identity motivation 

r 

Feel better about myself  

.46 

Feel empowered 

.45 

Receive positive feedback 

.42 

Keep others up to date with my life 

.40 

Identify with others like me 

.39 

Illustrate something about me 

.38 

Show achievement 

.35 

Manage others’ opinion of me 

.32 

Note. All relationships significant at p < .01. 

 

 



Hierarchical linear regression with stepwise entry evaluated the relative strength of each of the 

identity  motivations.  The  dependent  variable  was  selfie  intensity  and  the independent  variables  were 

identity  motivations  for  selfies  (including  other  people’s  motivations).  Four  identity  motivations 

remained in the model: to feel better about myself (β = .23), keep others up to date (β = .16), receive 

positive  feedback  (β  =  .17),  and  to  illustrate  something  about  me  (β  =  .13).  These  four  predictors 

explained  34%  of  the  variance  in  selfie  intensity,  F(4,  459)  =  45.77,  p  <  .0001.  However,  when  the 



International Journal of Communication 13(2019)  

This Is Who I Am  1155 

identity motivations scale (average composite score for all the identity motivations) was added to the 

model, the other variables were excluded (β = .53), F(1, 462) = 181.78, < .0001. Hypothesis 1 was 

confirmed. 

 

Hypothesis  2  predicted  that  forms  of  social  identity  would  be  positively  related  to  selfie 



intensity.  Each  of  the  social  identity  measures  was  intercorrelated  with  the  others.  These 

intercorrelations did not indicate multicollinearity (see Table 2). 

 

The bivariate tests revealed positive relationships between selfie intensity and closest friendship 



group identity (= .13, < .01), race identity (= .15, < .01), and SCA-social media (= .30, 

.01). Again, regression analysis with stepwise entry was conducted with the dependent variable as selfie 

intensity  and  the  independent  variables  as  race  identity,  closest  friendship  identity,  and  SCA-social 

media. Two forms of identity remained in the model: SCA-social media (β = .28) and race identity (β = 

.11). These variables explained 9% of the variance in selfie intensity, F(2, 461) = 25.13, p < .0001. 

Hypothesis 2 was partially confirmed. 

 

Research Questions 

 

Research  Question  1  inquired  about  the  relationship  among  gender,  race,  and  sexual 



orientation, and selfie motivations and contexts. 

 

Gender Differences 

 

A one-way ANOVA test revealed that women (M = 3.20, SD = 1.04) posted the highest mean 



for selfie intensity; men posted M = 2.28 (SD = 0.98), and transgender and other posted M = 2.5 (SD 

= 2.12), F(3, 466) = 24.83, p < .0001. 

 

To  assess  gender  differences  in  identity  motivations  and  contexts,  we  employed  two 



multivariate  analyses  of  variance  with  gender  as  the  independent  variable  (see  Table  4):  In  the  first 

test, the dependent variables were the identity motivations scale, other people’s identity motivations, 

and the motivation items composing the identity motivations scale, overall F(9, 445) = 32.18, < .0001. 

In the second test, the dependent variables were the selfie contexts (see Table 4). The results indicated 

that, for motivations, there were statistically significant differences on the means (higher for women) 

on all items except for other people’s motivations and “to manage other people’s opinions of me.” For 

selfie  contexts,  all  of  the  means  were  statistically  different  (women  higher)  except  for  political  and 

activist events, overall F(7, 457) = 10.30, p < .0001. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

1156  Valerie Barker and Nathian Shae Rodriguez 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019) 



Table 4. Gender Differences: Selfie Identity Motivations and Contexts. 

Variable 

Men M (SE

Women M (SE

Motivation 

 

 



Overall identity motivations 

2.70 (0.076) 

3.30 (0.047) 

Overall other people’s motivations 

3.82 (0.067) 

4.00 (0.041) ns 

Achievement 

2.97 (0.10) 

3.38 (0.062) 

Something about me 

3.20 (0.094) 

3.65 (0.058) 

To feel better 

2.53 (0.11) 

3.30 (0.065) 

To identify with others like me 

2.61 (0.10) 

2.92 (0.062) 

Keep people up to date 

3.12 (0.10) 

3.60 (0.06) 

Feel empowered 

2.50 (0.10) 

3.36 (0.063) 

Get feedback 

2.72 (0.11) 

3.36 (0.067) 

Manage other people’s opinions 

2.57 (0.11) 

2.78 (0.066) ns 

Contexts 

 

 



Holidays 

2.63 (0.11) 

3.59 (0.063) 

Vacation spots 

3.06 (0.10) 

3.96 (0.062) 

Bathroom shots 

1.68 (0.11) 

2.37 (0.064) 

Graduation 

2.68 (0.12) 

3.48 (0.072) 

Political event 

1.66 (0.09) 

1.66 (0.054) ns 

Activist event 

1.70 (0.10) 

1.94 (0.063) ns 



Note. Range = 1–5. Statistically different at p < .0001. 

 

Race and Sexual Orientation 

 

Identity motivations. Bivariate tests indicated that Black participants were more likely to report the 

motivation  to  take  selfies  to  “identify  with  others  like  me.”  A  one-way  ANOVA  confirmed  the  bivariate 

relationship, F(1, 468) = 6.90, p < .001 (Black: M = 3.38, SD = 1.10; other race: M = 2.79, SD = 1.12). 

 

Selfie  contexts.  Non-White  participants  were  more  likely  than  Whites  to  report  taking  selfies  at 

family occasions, F(1, 468) = 7.0, p < .01 (non-White: M = 3.10, SD = 0.08; White: M = 2.81, SD = 0.08); 

graduation, F(1, 468) = 4.38, p < .05 (non-White: = 3.39, SD = 0.09; White: M = 3.13, SD = 0.09); 

and activist events, F(1, 468) = 6.72, p < .01 (non-White: M = 2.01, SD = 0.08; White: M = 1.74, SD = 

0.07). Black participants were more likely to report taking selfies at activist events, F(1, 470) = 4.00, 

.05 (other race: M = 1.84, SD = 1.14; Black: M = 2.31, SD = 1.41). For Black participants, Twitter use and 

using activist events as selfie contexts were correlated (Twitter: r = .12, p < .05; activist event: r = .09, p 



< .05). 

 

LGBTQ participants were more likely to take selfies at political events, F(1, 471) = 4.91, p < .05 



(heterosexual: M = 1.62, SD = 0.96; LGBTQ: M = 1.94, SD = 1.19), and activist events, F(1, 471) = 8.61, 

p < .01 (heterosexual: M = 1.81, SD = 1.28; LGBTQ: M = 2.31, SD = 1.30). 

 

Research  Question  2  asked  about  relationships  among  selfie-taking,  gender,  race,  sexual 



orientation, and online activism. 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019)  

This Is Who I Am  1157 

LGBTQ participants were more likely to take selfies to feel empowered, F(1, 467) = 4.63, < .05 

(heterosexual: M = 3.07, SD = 1.20; LGBTQ: = 3.46, SD = 1.18). Similarly, LGBTQ participants were 

more likely to say that they take part in online activism, F(1, 460) = 18.70, p < .01 (heterosexual: M = 

1.65, SD = 0.58; LGBTQ: M = 2.04, SD = 0.77). Overall, online activism was related to feeling empowered 

via selfies (r = .13, p < .01). Therefore, we used analysis of covariance to investigate a possible interaction 

regarding sexual orientation in the relationship between selfie empowerment and online activism. The results 

confirmed  that  LGBTQ  participants  who  feel  empowered  by  selfies  are  also  more  likely  to  report  online 

activism, F(1, 460) = 20.12, p < .0001 (heterosexual: M = 1.67, SD = 0.58; LGBTQ: M = 2.00, SD = 0.77). 

See Figure 2. 

 

 



Figure 2. Sexual orientation interaction for selfie empowerment and online activism. 

 

 



 

------- LGBTQ, R

2

 Linear = .07 



_____ Heterosexual, R

2

 Linear = .008 



1158  Valerie Barker and Nathian Shae Rodriguez 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019) 

Research  Question  3  investigated  the  relationship  between  identity  motivations  for  selfies  and 

social media platforms. Table 5 illustrates the bivariate relationships between identity motives for selfies 

and selected social media platforms. Instagram posted the strongest correlations with identity motivations 

for selfies and selfie intensity. 

 

Table 5. Correlations: Social Media Platform Use and Identity Motivations. 

Variable 

Facebook 

Twitter 


Instagram 

Snapchat 

Show achievement 

.14** 


.12** 

.19** 


.13** 

Illustrate something about me 

.13** 

.11* 


.15** 

.20 


To feel better 

.06 


.21** 

.25** 


.16** 

Identify with others 

.08 

.12** 


.22** 

.13** 


Keep others up to date 

.12* 


.14** 

.22** 


.17** 

To feel empowered 

.06 

.25** 


.23** 

.14** 


To get positive feedback 

.02 


.19** 

.26** 


.14** 

To manage impressions 

.03 

.14** 


.15** 

.11* 


Selfie intensity 

.16** 


.24** 

.36** 


.27** 

*p < .05. **p < .01. 

 

Discussion 

 

Based  on  social  identity  theory,  this  study  investigated  correlates  of  selfie-taking  among  young 



adults:  identity  motivations  for  selfies  and  forms  of  social  identity  (friendship  group,  gender,  sexual 

orientation, race identity, and social capital affinity–social media). 

 

Participants  reported  that  they  take  selfies  to  say  something  about  who  they  are,  connect  with 



others,  feel  better  about  themselves,  feel  empowered,  and  to  a  lesser  extent,  identify  with  others  like 

themselves. The highest single-item selfie motivation correlates of selfie intensity were to feel better and to 

feel empowered. However, it was clear that all of the assessed motivations contributed to form a holistic 

contribution to selfie-taking. Selfies can be used as tools to communicate multiple identity dimensions. The 

group is one foundation for identity (who one is) and what one does (role vis-à-vis significant others) is 

another, both of which complement the self as an individual with idiosyncratic personal attributes (Stets & 

Burke, 2000). 

 

Race identity contributed to selfie intensity in this sample. Race identity speaks to the inclusion of 



in-group in self. Both off and online, race is a group marker and can be celebrated in a variety of ways: 

language, clothes, hair, music, tattoos. People can see and compare others who are like them and those 

who are not via selfies. However, race identity was not correlated with any racial group in our study; thus, 

it may simply be that those who are high identifiers with their racial group feel the need to celebrate it via 

selfies. Interestingly, the item “to identify with people like me” was  statistically  related  to  identifying  as 

Black.  This  is  consistent  with  findings  from  Williams  and  Marquez  (2015)  who  reported  that  African 

Americans regard selfies as a positive way to present to others of their race. Also, being Black, Twitter use, 

and  use  of  activist  events  as  selfie  contexts  were  intercorrelated.  Other  research  (e.g.,  Florini,  2014) 

highlights African American use of Twitter for “signifyin’” Blackness, which involves “millions of Black users 


International Journal of Communication 13(2019)  

This Is Who I Am  1159 

on Twitter networking, connecting, and engaging with others who have similar concerns, experiences, tastes 

and cultural practices” (Florini, 2014, p. 225). 

 

Although closest friendship group was a correlate of selfie intensity, the strongest predictors were 



gender (women) and social capital affinity–social media. All three of these variables were intercorrelated; 

therefore,  this  may  provide  evidence  of  intersecting  identities  among  women.  Women  reported  stronger 

feelings of close friendship identity and affinity with those in their social media networks, some of whom are 

close and others who are not well known although like-minded and similar. Also, women, when compared 

with men, reported differing estimates of motivations for selfies and contexts for taking them. In fact, men’s 

estimates for motivations and for contexts were low. This may indicate that men have motives and contexts 

for selfies not included in the survey. Conversely, it may be that young men just do not choose to take 

selfies.  Selfies  may  be  more  of  part  of  being  a  woman  in  a  cultural  sense,  especially  as  women  show  a 

greater  presence  on  social  media  and  report  relational  reasons  for  doing  so  (Krasnova,  Veltri,  Eling,  & 

Buxmann, 2017). 

 

Women and LGBTQ participants were more likely to report taking selfies to feel empowered. LGBTQ 



participants were also more likely to use activist and political events as selfie contexts and to engage in online 

activism. This, then, is something apart from the narcissism that is often associated with selfies. Instead, it 

appears that selfies can be used to make a personal and/or political statement. Indeed, the findings suggest a 

complexity behind this apparently simple act. This is not to deny evidence of ambivalence about posting selfies, 

as demonstrated by the disconnect between estimates about participants’ own motives for selfies and others’ 

motivations. That aside, the data imply that social media users value the opportunity to tell others something 

about themselves and to engage with others in the process by posting selfies. Arguably, this is productive on 

a personal  level  in  terms of  enacting  identity,  but  also on  a  wider  network level  in  connecting  with  others 

whether the common denominator is gender, race, and/or sexual orientation, or all of these. Considering the 

#MeToo  movement  and  the  push  to  prohibit  transgender  people  from  serving  in  the  military  and  even  to 

eradicate  the  definition  altogether  (Green,  Benner,  &  Pear,  2018),  online  empowerment,  affirmation,  and 

activism via selfies require further research. 

 

Although  not  directly  tested,  the  results  suggest  that  issues  of  intersectionality  are  at  play 



(Crenshaw, 1989). Individuals who are Black, LGBTQ, and women may negotiate between and among their 

personal  and  social  identities  and  use  selfies  to  reify  group  belonging.  Identities  interact  to  inform  the 

experiences  of  each  individual.  Women  of  color,  transwomen,  and  LGBTQ  members  tend  to  be 

disproportionately  oppressed  in  society.  In  addition  to  this  structural  intersectionality,  issues  of  political 

intersectionality—conflicting  political  agendas—also  invoke  additional  negotiation.  For  example,  White 

feminism has long excluded women from racial and ethnic minority groups and women who are economically 

disadvantaged (Watters, 2017). How does the intersectionality of these identities influence selfie-taking, 

posting, and social identity salience? Further research on intersectionality, identity, and selfies is warranted. 

 

Social capital affinity on social media was another significant predictor of selfie intensity. Social 



capital affinity relates to sense of online community. Senft and Baym (2015) describe a selfie as a gesture 

that can send and may be intended to send different messages to different individuals, communities, and 

audiences.  Duguay  (2016)  also  conceptualizes  selfies  as  part  of  a  conversation,  stating,  “Messages 


1160  Valerie Barker and Nathian Shae Rodriguez 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019) 

communicated through selfies can feature in conversations reinforcing dominant discourses within existing 

publics or form counterpublics, gathering people around alternative and opposing discourses” (p. 2). The 

selfie, then, acts a tool of connection and community-building via social media. 

 

Duguay (2016) describes social media as “non-human actors” (p. 2) in communication interactions. 



Social media form part of the selfie assemblage (Hess, 2015) whereby they provide a networked audience that 

is invited to like, comment, and/or share the selfie. As is typical of this age cohort, most participants reported 

taking selfies at least sometimes. Instagram and Snapchat were the most popular platforms. Instagram posted 

the strongest relationship with selfie intensity; however, the data provide evidence that specific social media 

platforms are outlets for specific types of identity motivations for selfies. For example, Instagram potentially 

allows selfie producers to receive positive feedback, Twitter is a platform on which one may feel empowered 

by posting a selfie, and Snapchat offers selfie-takers opportunities to say something about themselves. Other 

research  might  investigate  platform  attributes  that  encourage  certain  types  of  selfies,  conversations  about 

selfies, and solidarity with selfie producers. 

 

As  a  cross-sectional  study  using  a  convenience  sample,  no  claims  are  made  about  causal 



relationships or external validity. However, the sample was typical in terms of social media use and selfies 

(Pew Research Center, 2018). The findings form a basis for understanding trends about identity and selfie-

taking among young adults. Regarding the subsamples, however, there was a clear gender bias (women), 

the racial composition of the sample was not reflective of minorities in the wider population, and, in fact, 

the LGBTQ presence was greater than that estimated in the U.S. population. Gallup (2017) estimates that 

approximately  4%  identify  as  LGBTQ;  here,  about  11%  identified  as  LGBTQ.  Regardless,  the  statistical 

outcomes  reflect  existing  research  in  this  domain.  Overall,  the  scale  reliabilities  were  good,  but  future 

research  should  expand  the  measurement  of  selfie  motivations,  contexts,  and  types  of  activism. 

Experimental  designs  could  manipulate  contexts,  poses,  and  software  involving  selfies.  In  addition, 

qualitative research such as focus groups would add depth to these findings. 

 

Maddox (2018) suggests that selfies negotiate between lived experience and mass media and allow 



individuals to say, “This is in fact how I look, and this is how one should understand me” (p. 32). Selfie-

takers craft their identities online and communicate them to others in their chosen audiences/communities. 

This study sheds light on the ways in which online practices such as selfies enhance people’s lives. As well, 

the findings indicate that potentially marginalized groups can use selfies to say something about who they 

are  and,  in  doing  so,  feel  a  sense  of  affirmation,  connection,  and  empowerment.  This  goes  against  the 

perception that taking selfies is a frivolous, narcissistic practice with little meaning or value. 

 

 

References 



 

Affinity. (n.d.). In Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary. Retrieved from https://www.merriam-

webster.com/dictionary/affinity  

 

Ashmore, R. D., Deaux, K., & McLaughlin-Volpe, T. (2004). An organizing framework for collective 



identity: Articulation and significance of multidimensionality. Psychological Bulletin, 130, 80–114. 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019)  

This Is Who I Am  1161 

Auter, P. J. (2007). Portable social groups: Willingness to communicate, interpersonal communication 

gratifications, and cell phone use among young adults. International Journal of Mobile 



Communications, 5(2), 139–155. 

 

Barakat, C. (2014, April 16). Science links selfies to narcissism, addiction and low self-esteem. Retrieved 



from http://socialtimes.com/selfies-narcissism-addiction-low-selfesteem_b146764  

 

Barry, C. T., Doucette, H., Loflin, D. C., Rivera-Hudson, N., & Herrington, L. L. (2017). “Let me take a 



selfie”: Associations between self-photography, narcissism, and self-esteem. Psychology of 



Compartir con tus amigos:
1   2   3


La base de datos está protegida por derechos de autor ©absta.info 2019
enviar mensaje

    Página principal