International Journal of Communication 13(2019), 1143-1166



Descargar 227,76 Kb.
Ver original pdf
Página1/3
Fecha de conversión28.11.2019
Tamaño227,76 Kb.
  1   2   3

International Journal of Communication 13(2019), 1143–1166 

1932–8036/20190005 

Copyright  ©  2019  (Valerie  Barker  and  Nathian  Shae  Rodriguez).  Licensed  under  the  Creative  Commons 

Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives (by-nc-nd). Available at http://ijoc.org. 



 

This Is Who I Am: The Selfie as a Personal and Social Identity Marker 

 

VALERIE BARKER 

NATHIAN SHAE RODRIGUEZ 

San Diego State University, USA 

 

Prior  studies  have  described  selfies  as  narcissistic  vehicles  of  self-presentation;  by 



contrast,  based  on  social  identity  theory,  this  survey  of  young  adults  (N  =  472) 

examined how selfies signify forms of personal and social identity. Identity motivations 

for selfies, social capital affinity on social media, and racial identity were predictors of 

selfie intensity. Confirming other research, women were most likely to share selfies, but 

also  reported  differences  to  men  in  selfie  identity  motivations  and  contexts.  Among 

LGBTQ participants, selfies for empowerment correlated with online activism. 

 

Keywords: selfies, personal, social identity 

 

 



Based on social identity theory, this study investigates the value of selfies among young adults—

some of the most frequent selfie sharers. Of interest are identity motivations for selfies, the extent to 

which  selfies  relate  to  forms  of  social  identity  (with  close  friendship  groups,  gender,  race,  sexual 

orientation),  how  selfies  represent  performance  of  identity—doing/being  who  we  are  (Stets  &  Burke, 

2000)—and how much selfies provide affirmation from valued others. Whether technological affordances 

and social media facilitate (or inhibit) these processes are also examined. Among young people, selfie-

taking is often regarded as normative behavior (Pew Research Center, 2014; “Investigating the style of 

self-portraits,” 2019; YouGov, 2017); however, an air of negativity surrounds selfie-taking, especially for 

women  (Burns,  2015).  Pamela  Rutledge,  director  of  the  Media  Psychology  Research  Center,  stated, 

“Selfies  frequently  trigger  perceptions  of  self-indulgence  or  attention-seeking  social  dependence  that 

raises  the  damned-if-you-do  and  damned-if-you-don’t  specter  of  either  narcissism  or  very  low  self-

esteem” (quoted in Barakat, 2014, para. 10). Prior research (e.g., Barry, Doucette, Loflin, Rivera-Hudson, 

& Herrington, 2017) does provide evidence for narcissistic motivations for selfies, but with Mendelson and 

Papacharissi  (2010),  it  might  be  more  insightful  to  see  this  “as  a  step  toward  self-reflection  and  self-

actualization,  rather  than  instances  of  uncontrollable  self-absorption”  (p.  30).  Thus,  the  current  study 

focuses on the positive potential of selfies regarding personal and social identity. 

 

Some researchers (Hernández, 2009; Noland, 2006; Yefimova, Neils, Newell, & Gómez, 2015) have 



used self-photography to articulate the ways identity guides thought and activism by offering a method to 

build relationships within marginalized groups and allowing participants to speak for themselves. Tiidenberg 

                                                

Valerie Barker: valeriebarker@valeriebarker.net 

Nathian Shae Rodriguez: nsrodriguez@sdsu.edu 

Date submitted: 2018–05–22 



1144  Valerie Barker and Nathian Shae Rodriguez 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019) 

and Gómez Cruz (2015) argue that selfies represent a practice of freedom. They are “narrative acts and 

signifiers  of  community  belonging”  (Tiidenberg  &  Tekobbe,  2014,  p.  22).  Posting  selfies  may  teach 

community members new ways of seeing themselves or act as pleas for support (Tiidenberg & Tekobbe, 

2014). In short, selfies can be forms of identity work in which the in-group of the individual is either implicit 

or clearly enacted. Identity motives for selfies may be particularly important among victimized groups, for 

example, women, racial minorities, and/or LGBTQ people (e.g., Wargo, 2017). For examples, see Figure 1. 

Therefore, using the theoretical lens of social identity theory, the current study examines the role of selfies 

in  identity  construction  and  maintenance  among  young  adults  and  specifically  among  traditionally 

marginalized identities. 

 

 



Figure 1. Examples of selfies as vehicles of empowerment or identification. 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 



 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019)  

This Is Who I Am  1145 



Social Identity Theory 

 

Social identity theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1986) posits that social identity stems from “that part of 



the individual’s self-concept which derives from their knowledge of their membership of a social group (or 

groups) together with the value and emotional significance of that membership” (Tajfel, 1978, p. 63). People 

construct group norms during interactions with valued in-group members and internalize and enact such 

norms as part of their social identity (Turner, 1981). Hogg, Abrams, Otten, and Hinkle (2004) contend that 

people possess many social identities and personal identities as there are groups they belong to or personal 

relationships  they  have.  Context  affects  the  salience  and  form  of  social  identity.  Thus,  identities  vary  in 

subjective  importance  and  value  and  situational  accessibility  (Kiang,  Yip,  &  Fuligni,  2008).  It  is  also 

important to note that these social groups (or categories) are not monolithic, but rather overlap with one 

another—a concept called intersectionality (Crenshaw, 1989). 

 

Via social media, personal and social identity cues are manifested. Stets (1995) describes person 



[sic] identity as a set of meanings tied to and sustaining the self as an individual. For social identity theorists, 

personal  identity  is  “self-defined  and  evaluated  in  terms  of  idiosyncratic  personal  attributes  and  close 

personal relationships with specific other people” (Hogg, Abrams, & Brewer, 2017, p. 2). Selfie-takers may 

post shots relating to their personal identity, but also may include group markers (e.g., clothing, tattoos). 

Social media function as public displays of connection (Donath & boyd, 2004), very often involving pictures. 

Research  indicates  that,  among  young  people,  the  camera  is  a  frequently  used  mobile  affordance  for 

celebration of friends (Senft & Baym, 2015; YouGov, 2017). Instagram and Snapchat, both popular with 

18-  to  24-year-olds  (Pew  Research  Center,  2018),  provide  opportunities  to  connect  through  pictures, 

including selfies. 

 

Thus, we proposed the first hypothesis: 



 

H1:  

Identity  motivations  (i.e.,  self-presentation,  connection  with  others,  feelings  of  empowerment, 

activism) will be positively related to selfie-taking. 

 

Selfies and Forms of Social Identity 

 

In addition to how friendship group identity, gender, sexual orientation, and race identity relate to 



selfie-taking, loose affinity with like-minded others on social media was addressed: social capital affinity. 

Typically,  people  know  the  members  of  their  social  media  networks  (boyd,  2007),  but  many  of  these 

connections are not close, unlike family or friends. Also, some people are unknown offline. Prior research, 

outlined  below,  highlights  the  importance  of  social  media  connections  regarding  involvement  with  online 

content  and  in-group  membership,  specifically  social  capital  affinity,  friendship  groups,  gender,  sexual 

orientation, race/ethnicity, and activism. 

 

Social Capital Affinity 

 

Affinity  is  defined  as  sympathy  marked  by  community  of  interest  and  likeness  based  on  casual 



connection (Affinity, n.d.). Therefore, social capital affinity is the sense of community and likeness felt for 

1146  Valerie Barker and Nathian Shae Rodriguez 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019) 

people online who are weak ties (Granovetter, 1983). Even though such people may be known only casually 

or not at all offline, their opinions may be of interest, and their presence may enhance the online experience 

by providing a sense of camaraderie. Walther and colleagues (2011) suggest that “social identification and 

peer  group  influence  in  computer-mediated  communication  should  be  a  useful  element  in  explaining  a 

variety of influence effects in the new technological landscape” (p. 25). Related to this, Lange (2009) argues 

that affinity spaces exist online as social settings where people congregate to reinforce group connection or 

like-mindedness. Thus, it is expected that people are motivated by social capital affinity in posting selfies 

for intergroup communication (Katz & Crocker, 2015). 

 

Friendship Group Identity 

 

Group identity is particularly meaningful to young people (Williams & Thurlow, 2005). In terms of 



developmental  tasks,  late  adolescence  (17–21  years  of  age;  World  Health  Organization,  2019)  is  partly 

associated with individualization from family, with an additional challenge in maintaining existing peer group 

identity  (Manago,  2015)  and  simultaneously  transitioning  to  new  friendship  groups.  In  doing  so,  young 

people invest a lot of time communicating on social media. In focus group discussions with young people, 

Walsh, White, and McDonald-Young (2009) found that such contact facilitated connectedness and enhanced 

feelings of belonging. They concluded that, because young people are developing their identity outside the 

immediate family, they rely on friends and peers to provide a sense of community. It is plausible to assume 

a relationship between friendship group identity and selfie-taking/posting. 

 

Gender Identity 

 

Gender identity is a person’s experience of his/her gender (Human Rights Campaign, 2019; Morrow 



& Messinger, 2006). It may or may not be related to biological sex. Gender categories serve as a basis for 

social  identity  (Moghadam,  1992).  Gender  attributes  are  archetypally  assigned  to  males  and  females, 

including expectations about masculinity and femininity, biological sex, and gender expression (Eller, 2015). 

Some people do not identify with specific, or all, of the aspects of gender assigned to their biological sex; 

they may identify as transgender, genderqueer, or nonbinary (Zastrow, 2013). It is possible, however, that 

gender  identity  might  relate  to  selfie-taking  because  women  are  more  likely  to  post  selfies  (e.g.,  Dhir, 

Pallesen, Torsheim, & Andreassen, 2016; “Investigating the style of self-portraits,” 2019 Sorokowska et al., 

2016). 


 

Selfies and Gender 

 

The dominant media discourse about selfies is that this is a “girl thing” (Burns, 2015; Mascheroni, 



Vincent, & Jimenez, 2015; Warfield, 2014; Williams & Marquez, 2015). A definition provided by the Urban 

Dictionary (Selfie, n.d.) states that selfies are 

 

stupid  photos  that  14-year-old  girls  take  of  themselves.  They  take  these  photos  to  let 



people know what they look like when nobody else is around. Tags are also used after the 

taking of a selfie when posted on a website of some sort. Some examples of these are: 

#nomakeup #twerk and other stupid words that girls think make themselves sound cool. 


International Journal of Communication 13(2019)  

This Is Who I Am  1147 

But research indicates that selfies are much more than that for women and girls. Katz and Crocker 

(2015)  report  that  many  of  their  interviewees  felt  that  selfies  told  a  story  about  their  lives  and  elicited 

conversations  within  chosen  in-groups:  “Often  selfies  referenced  shared  experiences,  favorite  movies, 

people the users knew, or other ingroup referential images” (p. 1868). Also, Williams and Marquez (2015) 

show  that  women  and  men  produce  and  consume  selfies  differently:  Selfie  poses  conform  to  gender 

stereotypes, but also varying norms determine what is acceptable in selfies for men versus women. 

 

Sexual Orientation Identity 

 

Sexual  orientation  identity  involves  self-identification  as  a  person  enacting  a  specific  sexual 



orientation with beliefs, traits, evaluations, group attachments, and behaviors connected with that group 

identification (Ashmore, Deaux, & McLaughlin-Volpe, 2004). A person who identifies as heterosexual likely 

experiences this form of social identity differently from other sexual orientations. Members of traditionally 

stigmatized sexual orientations face a challenge in developing positive, stable, and secure social identity 

within a cultural framework replete with negative stereotyping and treatment (Crocker, Major, & Steele, 

1998). But selfies may be used to gain affirmation from others who identify similarly; for example, Katz and 

Crocker  (2015)  mention  that  a  participant  reported  “purposely  using  selfies  to  play  with  both  male  and 

female  presentations  of  self  and  in  general  to  identify  as  queer  gendered”  (p.  1866).  Similarly,  Duguay 

(2016) believes that selfies “reflect and propagate counter-discourses of sexuality and gender to oneself, 

peers, and publics” (p. 2). 

 

Race Identity 

 

Racial identity is often a frame wherein individuals categorize others based on skin color (O’Hearn, 



1998). Skin color is one label that allows individuals to ally with or to distance themselves from those they 

consider like or different from themselves (Chávez & Guido-DiBrito, 1999). By contrast, race identity may be 

treated as a social construction associated with sense of group belonging: the perception that individuals share 

a common origin with in-group members (Helms, 1993). Race identity is constructed in concert with in-group 

others and, in comparison to, out-groups, a point of connection that helps group members interpret the world 

and feel pride in themselves. Selfies may help in this process. Williams and Marquez (2015) found that Black 

and Latino respondents reported producing selfies more frequently than White respondents. In addition, Black 

and Latino women were fairly accepting of men in general taking selfies. By contrast, White women reported 

definitive rules about White men’s selfies, favoring natural poses. 

 

Accordingly, the second hypothesis predicted: 



 

H2:  

There will be a positive relationship between levels of reported social identity (i.e., friendship group, 

gender, sexual orientation, race/ethnicity identity, and social capital affinity) and selfie-taking. 

 

Aside  from  levels  of  identity,  potential  intercorrelations  among  demographic  attributes,  identity 



motivations for selfies, and selfie-contexts were of interest. 

 


1148  Valerie Barker and Nathian Shae Rodriguez 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019) 



RQ1:  

To what extent do gender, sexual orientation, and race/ethnicity relate to selfie identity motivations 

and contexts? 

 

Selfies, Empowerment, and Activism 

 

Much  selfie  research  targets  self-presentation  and  impression  management.  However,  Lindgren 



(2017) believes that “selfies, while in part reproducing social stereotypes related to power, can potentially be 

used  to  take  control  in  various  ways”  (p.  119).  As  mentioned,  extant  research  on  selfies  hints  at  showing 

solidarity, activism, and/or empowerment with an in-group. Other research about selfies and self-photography 

documents presence in ways that reinvent what it is to be, as in gender, disability, or societal status. 

 

Karadimitriou and Veneti (2016) argue that selfies present opportunities for new forms of interaction 



between citizens and politicians. They suggest that political selfies are something apart from traditional media, 

that they provide a sense of intimacy, and, ultimately, may gain mainstream media attention. By attracting 

wider public interest, selfies can garner support for a cause. Eler (2017) cites the Standing Rock protests (see 

Figure 1, upper right photo), where Energy Transfer was to build a massive oil pipeline. Standing Rock selfies 

evidenced what was taking place there. When news circulated that law enforcement was using Facebook check-

ins to track who was at the protest camp, more than a million people “checked in” at Standing Rock in support. 

 

Consequently,  the  possible  intercorrelation  of  selfie-taking,  political/activist  events,  sense  of 



empowerment, and reported online activism is investigated. 

 

RQ2:  



Are selfie-taking, forms of identity, gender, sexual orientation, and race/ethnicity related to online 

activism? 

 

Selfies and Social Media 

 

Hess (2015) sees selfies as an assemblage of dimensions. The selfie is a version of self. The place 



where the selfie is taken is significant, whether it be at home, a vacation spot, or a restaurant. The perspective 

and the pose also speak about performance of self. Finally, the networked audience (on social media) that is 

invited to like or share the selfie also supports the motivation behind the selfie. Selfies posted on Snapchat 

versus Instagram versus Facebook convey something different and may be perceived differently by different 

publics. 

 

Katz and Crocker (2015) found that, on Snapchat, the rapid exchange of selfies formed a dialogue. 



Snapchat  facilitated  interaction  with  friends  where  selfies  depicted  shared  experiences,  acquaintances  in 

common, or other in-group images. For Duguay (2016), Instagram’s affordances and content generation tools 

were said to encourage users to focus on aesthetic appearance, whereas Vine’s limited editing tools and support 

of creative sharing allowed users to highlight personal experiences. These findings generate the final research 

question: 

 

RQ3:  



Are types of identity motivations for selfies linked to specific social media platforms? 

 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019)  

This Is Who I Am  1149 



Method 

 

Survey participants (N = 472) were recruited online via Sona Systems, which provides subject pool 



software for universities. Students earned extra credit points for participation in Spring 2018. The sample 

was 53% White (n = 260). The remaining participants identified as Hispanic/Latino/Latinx (25%) = 117, 

African American (6%) = 26, Asian American (20%) = 95, and Pacific Islander (8%) = 39. Some participants 

reported  more  than  one  ethnicity.  Most  of  the  participants  were  female  (73%;  n  =  343;  male  =  125, 

transgender = 1, other = 2). Fifty-one participants identified as LGBTQ (10.8%). Participants’ average age 

was 20.69 years (range = 18–63; SD = 3.90). 

 

Measures 

 

Measurements  included  demographic  information  (age,  gender,  race,  sexual  orientation)  and 



estimates of social media use. Scales measured selfie intensity (i.e., selfie-taking frequency, frequencies of 

selfie editing, use of filters); level of friendship group identification, a diagrammatic gender, race, sexual 

orientation  identification  measure,  and  a  measure  of  affinity  with  others  on  social  media  (social  capital 

affinity); measures of identity motivations and perceptions’ of other people’s motivations for selfies; selfie 

contexts and liking for other people’s selfie contexts; and online activism. The participants’ scores were the 

overall means of the scale items. Questions were closed-ended, and participants typically responded on a 

5-point range (e.g., 1 = very strongly disagree, 5 = very strongly agree). The background and explanation 

of the scales appear below. 

 

To measure social media and phone apps usage, two groups of items asked participants for their 



estimates of frequency of use. This allowed for face comparison with data from representative samples (e.g., 

Pew Research Center, 2018) and an opportunity to determine whether specific platforms/apps correlated 

with selfie motivations/contexts. 

 

Frequency of Social Media Platform Use 

 

Using measures adapted from Gil de Zúñiga, Garcia-Perdomo, and McGregor (2015), participants 



estimated  their  frequency  of  use  of  seven  platforms  (7-point  scale).  The  most  popular  platform  was 

Instagram, followed by Snapchat, YouTube, and Facebook. See Table 1. 

 

Frequency of Phone Apps Use 

 

Seven items adapted from Auter (2007) measured frequency of phone app use (7-point scale): 



camera, text messaging, games, music, utility (e.g., calculator) three-way calling, and voicemail. The most 

frequently used apps were texting, music, and camera use. 

 

 

 



 

 


1150  Valerie Barker and Nathian Shae Rodriguez 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019) 



Table 1. Frequencies of Use: Social Media and Mobile Phone Apps. 

How often do 

you use the 

following 

social media 

platforms? 

(range = 1–

7) 


Facebook  Twitter  Instagram 

Tumblr 


YouTube 

Snapchat 

WhatsApp   

Mean (SD

4.13 

(2.06) 


3.66 

(2.39) 


5.78 

(1.85) 


1.77 

(1.47) 


4.81 

(1.93) 


5.75 

(1.87) 


1.87 

(1.67) 


 

How often do 

you use the 

following 

options on 

your mobile 

phone? 

(range = 1–



7) 

Camera 


Music 

Voicemail 

Texting 

Games 


Utility 

Three way  Selfies 

Mean (SD

5.43 


(1.53) 

6.02 


(1.56) 

3.04 


(1.75) 

6.34 


(1.26) 

3.04 


(1.83) 

4.59 


(1.64) 

1.77 


(1.31) 

3.03 


(1.08) 

 

Selfie Intensity 

 

This  scale  captured  the  effort  invested  in  constructing  selfies.  Hess  (2015)  observed  that,  in 



composing  selfies,  people  often  add  “filters  and  other  digital  manipulations  to  the  image  before 

disseminating them via social networks” (p. 1639). Selfies are re-presented and enhanced; thus, how often 

people take selfies is only a part of selfie intensity. Two additional items (5-point scale) asked how often 

participants edit and use filters on selfies. These items posted an alpha of .84. 

 

Identity Motives for Selfies 

 

Prior qualitative and quantitative research (e.g., Diefenbach & Christoforakos, 2017; Krämer et al., 



2017; Mascheroni et al., 2015; Tiidenberg & Gómez Cruz, 2015; Tiidenberg & Tekobbe, 2014; Warfield, 

2014)  has  investigated  selfies  as  symbols  of  self  disclosure,  self-presentation,  self-promotion,  signs  of 

belonging, and sense of community. However, Hess (2015) found that “the same networked audiences that 

celebrate sharing selfies also lambaste those who somehow do not fit the technological and cultural decorum 

found online” (p. 1643). Similarly, Diefenbach and Christoforakos (2017) report that people are often critical 

of other people’s selfies compared with their own. These findings reveal a disconnect between what people 

report about their own selfies and what they believe about other people’s selfies. Therefore, participants 

were asked about their own selfie motivations (and contexts; see below) and those of others. 

 

Reflecting extant research, nine items (5-point scale) measured identity motivations for selfies. These 



included items assessing self-presentation motivations and connection with others. Factor analysis (see Data 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019)  

This Is Who I Am  1151 

Analysis section) indicated that these items formed a unidimensional scale posting Cronbach alphas of .89 for 

participants’ motivations and .92 for other people’s motivations. Analysis of separate items revealed that, for 

participants,  “to  illustrate  something  about  me”  (M  =  3.51,  SD  =  1.08)  posted  the  highest  mean  and  “to 

manage others’ opinion of me” (M = 2.70, SD = 1.19) posted the lowest mean. For participants’ assessments 

of other people’s motivations, the highest mean was “to receive positive feedback” (M = 4.21, SD = 0.90) and 

the lowest mean was “to identify with others like them” (M = 3.68, SD = 1.02). 

 

Selfie Contexts 

 

Where  people  photograph  themselves  affects  how  others  perceive  them  (Lobinger  &  Brantner, 



2015). Consequently, the context for the selfie is worthy of investigation “either in everyday situations or 

during  special  moments  and  events  (such  as  travels)”  (Lobinger  &  Brantner,  2015,  p.  1854).  Thus, 

participants  were  asked  to  evaluate  how  often  (5-point  scale)  they  take  selfies  in  eight  contexts:  family 

occasions, holidays, vacation spots, bathroom, graduation, political event, activist event, or other (write in). 

Vacation spots posted the highest mean (M = 3.72, SD = 1.23); political events posted the lowest mean (M 

= 1.65, SD = 0.10). In addition, participants reported how much they liked seeing other people’s selfies in 

these settings (7-point scale). Again, vacation spots posted the highest mean (M = 5.48, SD = 1.29); other 

people’s  bathroom  shots  posted  the  lowest  mean  (M  =  3.25,  SD  =  1.58).  Overall,  participants  did  not 

particularly like to see other people’s selfies (range = 1–5; M = 2.43, SD = 0.90). 

 

Social Identity Measures 

 

Friendship group identification. Research shows that for young people, members of their immediate 

peer group are important and influential (e.g., Larson, Whitton, Hauser, & Allen, 2007). Close friends, of 

comparable age and who exhibit similar ideas, allegiances, clothing styles, and other group markers, help 

young people to individuate from family and acquire a sense of strong in-group connection. According to 

social identity theory, social identity involves the value and significance attached to group membership—

collective self-esteem. Thus, there is an element of social comparison in assessing social identity. Friendship 

group identification was assessed using six items adapted from the 16-item Luhtanen and Crocker (1992) 

Collective Self-Esteem Scale to provide a measure of self-evaluation of identity with participants’ closest 

group of friends. Luhtanen and Crocker conducted three initial studies to validate the scale, where it was 

found  to  positively  correlate  with  collectivism  scales.  Because  of  space  considerations,  eight  negatively 

worded items were omitted. Of the remaining eight items, two were excluded because they were a differently 

worded  repetition  of  others  in  the  scale.  The  remaining  six  items  were  representative  of  the  original 

dimensions  of  the  scale  and  have  been  effectively  employed  in  prior  research.  The  items  were  (1)  “The 

group I belong to is an important reflection of who I am,” (2) “I’m glad to be a member of my group,” (3) 

“Others respect my group,” (4) “I feel good about the group I belong to,” (5) “I participate in the activities 

of my group,” and (6) “Others consider my group good.” In the present study, the scale showed high internal 

reliability (.91) and the overall mean was high (M = 4.14, SD = 0.68, range = 1–5). The means did not 

differ  across  gender,  White/non-White,  or  sexual  orientation  (each  median  =  4.00).  Also,  the  scale  was 

positively related to the other identity measures (see Table 2). 

 

 



1152  Valerie Barker and Nathian Shae Rodriguez 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019) 



Table 2. Scales. 

Selfie intensity: never/rarely/sometimes/often/very often (α = .84; M = 3.00, SD = 1.10) 

How often do you take selfies? 

Edit your selfies? 

Use filters on your selfies? 

Identity motivations for selfies: I take selfies to . . . (strongly disagreestrongly agree

Participant (α = .89; M = 3.14, SD = 0.88)  

Perceptions of others’ motivations: I think other people take selfies to . . . (α = .92; M = 3.95, SD = 0.75) 

Show achievement 

Illustrate something about me 

Feel better about myself 

Identify with others like me 

Keep others up to date with my life 

Feel empowered 

Receive positive feedback 

Manage others’ opinions of me 

Other (please write in) 

Online activism: How many times have you performed the following activities? (never/once/twice/three 



or more times; α = .78; M = 1.70, SD = 0.62) 

Sent an e-mail to a political official when requested by a group you support 

Sent an e-mail to a political official under my own volition 

Signed an online petition 

Donated money to a political organization 

Followed or liked a political figure on social media 

Tweeted or commented about a political official using social media 

Asked a question of a political figure using social media 

Friendship group identification: Please say how much you agree with following statements about your 

closest group of friends: (strongly disagree–strongly agree; α = .91; M = 4.13, SD = 0.68) 

The group I belong to is an important reflection of who I am 

I’m glad to be a member of my group 

Others respect my group 

I feel good about the group I belong to 

I participate in the activities of my group 

Others consider my group good 

Social capital affinity–social media: Thinking about the social media platform you use most, say how 

much you agree with the following statements: (strongly disagree–strongly agree; α = .88; M = 3.58, 



SD = 0.75) 

The opinions of those visiting this platform interest me 

Interacting with people visiting this platform makes me feel like part of a community 

When visiting this platform, hearing what others say enhances the experience 

Communication with the people visiting this platform raises points of interest for me 

Being with people visiting this platform makes me want to follow up on things 



International Journal of Communication 13(2019)  

This Is Who I Am  1153 

Intercorrelations for social identifications 

Identification 





1. Race/ethnicity  

 

 

 



 

2. Gender  

.36** 

.58** 


 

 

3. Sexual orientation  



.27** 

 

 



 

4. Friendship group  

.14** 

.24** 


.24** 

 

5. Social capital affinity–social media 



.12* 

.12* 


.15* 

.30** 


Note. Identification measures: range = 1–7; race identification: M = 4.40, SD = 1.71; gender identification: 

range = 1–7; M = 5.58, SD = 1.58; sexual orientation identification: range = 1–7; M = 5.67, SD = 1.77. 

Friendship  group  identification:  range  =  1–5;  M  =  4.13,  SD  =  0.67;  social  capital  affinity–social  media: 

range = 1–5; M = 3.58, SD = 0.75. 

*p < .05. **p < .01. 

 

Gender, sexual orientation, race identification. “When individuals categorize themselves as group 

members,  the  ingroup  becomes  included  in  the  self  and  individuals  recognize  the  characteristics  of  the 

ingroup  as  representing  part  of  themselves”  (Tropp  &  Wright,  2001,  pp.  586–587).  The  current  study 

assessed  gender  identification  as  distinct  from  actual  gender.  Participants  were  asked  how  much  they 

identify with their gender without reporting at that point how they categorize themselves in terms of gender. 

The inclusion of in-group in self-measure separately assessed identification with gender, sexual orientation, 

and  race  (as  ascribed  groupings).  It  consisted  of  seven  pairs  of  circles  varying  in  degree  of  overlap. 

Participants selected the pair of circles that best represented their level of identification with a specific in-

group. Its visual representation captured in-group identification as the interrelationship of self and group. 

This measure provided data on how salient an individual’s identity was relative to gender, sexual orientation, 

and race; however, it did not measure intersections of all three. Identities, specifically social identities, do 

overlap with one another (Crenshaw, 1989). Some evidence for this was present in the current data in that 

each identity measure was intercorrelated with the others (see Table 2). 

 

Social capital affinity (SCA)–social media. Social media feature heavily in the lives of young adults. 

This scale measured sense of affinity with like-minded individuals who may be weak ties (Granovetter, 1983) 

on social media. Five items measured affinity with others on the participants’ favorite platform. For example, 

they were asked how much they agreed that “interacting with people on this platform makes me feel like 

part of a community.” The scale posted a Cronbach alpha of .88. 

 

Online  activism.  Participants  were  asked  to  evaluate  the  frequency  with  which  they  performed 

seven activities (1 = never, 2 = once, 3 = twice, and 4 = three or more times), for example, followed or 

liked a political figure on social media and tweeted or commented about a political official using social media. 

The scale posted a Cronbach alpha of .78 and correlated with reported selfies taken at political (r = .33, p 

< .001) and activist events (r = .35, p < .001). Measures are summarized in Table 2. 

 

Data Analysis 

 

Scale  items  were  coded  positively:  A  high  score  indicated  higher  race  identification,  identity 



motivations, and so forth. To detect latent factors among identity motivations for selfies for participants and 

1154  Valerie Barker and Nathian Shae Rodriguez 

International Journal of Communication 13(2019) 

for participants’ perceptions about other people’s motivations for selfies, we employed factor analysis using 

principal axis factoring and Oblimin rotation. Regarding participants’ responses about themselves, one major 

factor accounted for 52.8% of the variance; however, a lesser factor emerged accounting for 6.8% of the 

variance in motivations. Inspection of the rotation revealed that there were strong cross-loadings for all of 

the variables. Thus, a unidimensional scale was constructed for participants’ identity motivations. For the 

participants’ perceptions of other people’s motivations for selfies, only one factor resulted. This accounted 

for 58.8% of the variance in selfies. A paired sample t test revealed a significant difference in scores for 

participants’  reported  selfie-taking  motivations  (M  =  3.10,  SD  =  0.88)  compared  with  their  perceptions 

about  other  people’s  motivations  for  selfie-taking  (M  =  3.95,  SD  =  0.75),  t(457)  =  -19.00,  p  =  .0001. 

Subsequently, bivariate tests using Pearson’s correlation coefficients were performed, followed by analysis 

of  variance  (ANOVA)  testing  to  assess  differences  among  groups  of  participants.  Regression  analysis 

determined the relative value of selfie intensity correlates.. 

 



Compartir con tus amigos:
  1   2   3


La base de datos está protegida por derechos de autor ©absta.info 2019
enviar mensaje

    Página principal